Yes, it is only April, but even if employers updated their handbooks at the beginning of 2016, they should take another look at the handbooks to ensure they comply with new regulations issued by California’s Fair Employment and Housing Council.  The new regulations under the Fair Employment and Housing Act are effective April 1, 2016.  While the regulations are a restatement of the current law, they set forth an additional requirement that employers adopt a written discrimination, harassment, and retaliation prevention policy that meet certain conditions.

The new regulations provide that employers “have an affirmative duty to create a workplace environment that is free from employment practices prohibited by the Act.”  The regulations set forth that in addition to providing employees the Department’s DFEH-185 brochure on sexual harassment, or an alternative writing that complies with Government Code section 12950, employers are required to develop a harassment, discrimination, and retaliation policy that meets certain requirements.

Recommended actions for employers:

  1. Update handbooks to ensure the harassment policy complies with the new regulations.
  2. Update handbook acknowledgments to obtain written acknowledgments from employees that they have received the new policy.
  3. Review the new hire packets provided to new employees to ensure it contains the brochure DFEH-185 and all other required documents (disclosures and policies required to be provided to employees is becoming very detailed and complicated to comply with).
  4. Ensure all companies with 50 or more employees are compliant with its obligation to provide two hours of sexual harassment prevention training to all managers/supervisors.

Please contact me if you have any questions about updating handbooks or new hire packets to comply with these regulations.

I cannot believe it is already Friday, and one week done in 2016.  This Friday’s Five focuses on a few action items for employers can use to start a review of their employment policies for 2016.Happy New Year 2016

 1.      Ensure the new hire packets contain all required information for employees. 

If employers do not have a standard new hire packet, the first step in 2016 should be implementing this packet.  There are many disclosures and documents that need to be provided to employees when they are hired.  This packet should be reviewed by legal counsel as well to ensure that all required forms are included for each employee.  For example, employees earning commissions must be provided the commission agreement in a writing signed by both the employee and the employer.  See Labor Code Section 2751.

 2.      Review pay stubs to ensure they are compliant. 

The DLSE provides an example of a pay stub and the required information for an hourly employee:

Also, do not forget that with California’s paid sick leave law that took effect on July 1, 2015, employers will have additional reporting information regarding employees’ accrued paid sick leave and usage. Employers must show how many days of sick leave an employee has available on the employee’s pay stub or a document issued the same day as a paycheck.

3.      Analyze if arbitration agreements are appropriate.

Employers should understand the potential benefits and costs associated with arbitration agreements, and should review with counsel whether they might be appropriate for their workforce.

4.      Review payroll practices and ensure overtime is being paid correctly.

If non-exempt, review to ensure the appropriate overtime is being paid at the proper rate, and that all overtime is being paid for work done over eight hours in a day and 40 hours in a week.

Generally, any work performed over eight hours in any workday or more than six days in any workweek requires that the employee is compensated for the overtime at not less than:

  •  One and one-half times the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of eight hours up to and including 12 hours in any workday, and for the first eight hours worked on the seventh consecutive day of work in a workweek; and
  • Double the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 12 hours in any workday and for all hours worked in excess of eight on the seventh consecutive day of work in a workweek.

Employers should review that the employee’s “regular rate of pay” used for calculating overtime includes all required payments to the employee such as non-discretionary bonuses, piecework earnings, or commissions.  The Department of Industrial Relations provides some good examples on what must be included when calculating the regular rate of pay and how to calculate the applicable overtime.

5.      Understand new laws taking effect in 2016.

Employers should learn about the new laws passed that are effective in 2016.  I’ve posted some excerpts from a webinar I recently conducted last week on a few new laws facing California employers in 2016.  I’ll be posting additional excerpts soon as well.  If you would like to be notified about future webinars or seminars I conduct, you can sign up here.

Speaking with some clients, I sense their overwhelming confusion in setting up employment policies in California. While it can be a daunting task, I remind them that the key is to approach it in a systematic process, and once the system is in place, compliance can be very easy. While there are many issues employers need to review on an ongoing basis, there are five that are a good starting point:

 1)  Meal and rest breaks

Yes, California employers are still being sued for meal and rest break violations. This should be a primary concern for all California employers, and simply part of standard operating procedures by now.

 2)  New hire process and packets

Employers should review their hiring process, including:

3)  Paid sick leave compliance

As of July 1, 2015, employers must allow employees to accrue paid sick leave under California law. I’ve written about the law, as well as the amendment to clarify the law signed by Governor Brown on July 13, 2015.

The DIR provides a great resources page every employer should review.

 4)  Exempt vs. non-exempt employee classifications

5)  Uncompensated work-time

Employers need to be careful and have policies in place to address claims from employees that they were not paid for all time worked. These claims can take many different forms:

  • Travel time may have to be paid
  • Off-the-clock work
  • On-call time
  • Pre-shift or post-shift work. In 2014, Amazon workers sued their staffing company claiming that the post-shift security check employees had to undergo should have been compensated work-time. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the staffing company’s favor, but nevertheless, it was a costly case for the company and required protracted litigation.

 

1. CEOs and founders need to be involved in the hiring process. This is simply something too important for a company to leave to other people.  Sam Altman, of Y Combinator, wrote:

The vast majority of founders don’t spend nearly enough time hiring. After you figure out your vision and get product-market fit, you should probably be spending between a third and a half of your time hiring. It sounds crazy, and there will always be a ton of other work, but it’s the highest-leverage thing you can do, and great companies always, always have great people. You can’t outsource this—you need to be spending time identifying people, getting potential candidates to want to work at your company, and meeting every person that comes to interview. Keith Rabois believes the CEO/founders should interview every candidate until the company is at least 500 employees.

Founders interviewing employee number 1 to 500 sets to tone for the company in many ways in addition to the value mentioned by Sam. First, meeting all new hires illustrates that the employees are valued. Second, it shows that the founders are approachable and should the employee have any complaints they could discuss the issues with the founders. Granted once the company passes the 50 employee mark, it becomes more difficult to have a personal relationship with everyone in the company, but at least the founders are meeting everyone working at the company. This proves to the employees that they are valued. Usually the company’s open door policy states that if the employee has any complaints, they are free to discuss it with their supervisor, and if appropriate their concerns can be escalated to the founders/CEO. Meeting with employee during the hiring process can give teeth to the open door policy, and promote the practice of speaking with the founders if any employees have concerns about work.

2. Try working with the applicant first. I don’t care how many interviews someone has conducted, no one can determine if an applicant will be a good fit in a company over an interview at lunch. No matter how good you believe your interview questions are at finding out the applicant’s true values, work ethic, and knowledge base, anyone with an internet can study-up on how to handle almost any type of interview scenario and look amazing during the interview. How does a company get past this problem? Sam Altman again has some great advice and recommends hiring the applicant as an independent contractor and giving her a day or two of work on a noncritical project. I recommend that companies may take it one step further, and depending on the circumstances, it may even be appropriate to hire the applicant as an employee with the idea that they are to only work on one short project during the nights or weekends. There is nothing in the law that prevents a company from hiring employees for a day or two to see how they would work, that is the idea behind at-will employment.

3. Don’t assume all workers are the same in under the law. Not everyone hired can be classified as independent contractors or exempt employees.  These legal terms have very specific tests that must be met, and failure to properly classify workers could expose the company to large penalties. If everyone in a company is classified as an independent contractor or an exempt employee, more likely than not, there is a problem that needs to be addressed, and the company needs to evaluate its HR function more carefully.

4. Develop an employee handbook. All new hires should be given a handbook that sets out the company’s practices and procedures. Handbooks are not legally required in California, but there are required policies that companies must have depending on their size. A handbook is the perfect way to communicate the required policies to all new hires in a consistent and documented manner.

5. Have a new hire packet. The legal documents required to be provided to a new employee is becoming very detailed. Companies should standardize a new hire packet that meets all legal requirements.

Here is a list of some of the required notices employers must provide to new employees in California. Sometimes I have a hard time coming up with five rules or items for the Friday’s Five list, but not this time – I blew through five items (it is California after all): 

Document Title

Link to Document

Notice to Employee (Wage Theft Prevention Act) (for non-exempt employees)

Download here

I-9 – Employment Eligibility Verification

Download here

Right to Workers’ Compensation Benefits pamphlet

Download here

State Disability Insurance Provisions pamphlet – DE 2515

Download here

Paid Family Leave pamphlet – DE 2511

Download here

Sexual Harassment pamphlet

Download here

New Health Insurance Marketplace Coverage Options Form

Form for employers with health insurance plans – download here

Form for employer without health insurance plans – download here

Other documents I often recommend that employers have in their new hire packets are:

·   Commission Agreement (if applicable)

·   Meal and Rest Break Acknowledgment of employer’s policy

·   Employee Handbook and Acknowledgment