California Legislation Update

On September 22, 2021, Governor Newsom signed AB 701 into law aimed at “warehouse distribution centers” and the use of quotas.  While the law was drafted to curtail alleged practices of Amazon, it will impact many warehouses across California.  Here are five key questions California employers need to understand about the new law:

1. Which

In 2019, California enacted AB 51, making it an unlawful employment practice for employers to require applicants or employees, as a condition of employment, to waive any right, forum, or procedure relating to a Labor Code or FEHA claim. The short version of this word salad is that employers couldn’t mandate arbitration agreements. However, a

California employers have been on a four-week rollercoaster ride over Cal/OSHA’s revisions to its Emergency Temporary Standard (“ETS”). The ETS was originally effective November 2020. In May 2021, the Board for Cal/OSHA approved revisions to the ETS, and then withdrew the revisions five days before California’s state-wide reopening on June 15. Days later the Board

Late last week, California enacted SB 93, requiring specific hospitality employers to offer employees laid-off due to COVID-19 preference for new positions between now and December 31, 2024. The new law is similar to a bill the governor vetoed last year, AB 3216.

Hospitality employers should read below to determine whether this new

On Friday, we replayed our March 23 webinar covering various topics including the American Rescue Plan’s renewal of FFCRA benefits and California’s brand new COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave (SB 95). In both the original run and the replay, we got tons of great questions from employers about these two new laws. Below are

As written about previously, Governor Newsom signed new legislation on March 19, 2021 requiring California employers to provide COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave.  California employers were required to provide California COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave under an old law passed in 2020 that expired on December 31, 2020.  There are a few key differences

On November 30, 2020, California’s Office of Administrative Law approved Cal/OSHA’s emergency standards setting forth new requirements for California employers. Under the new requirements employers must develop a written COVID-19 prevention program, train employees, provide personal protective equipment to employees, provide certain information to employees, and abide by record keeping and new reporting requirements.

SB 973, a new California law passed in September 2020, created a new obligation for California employers to annually submit pay data report to the Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH).  The DFEH has recently published a frequently asked questions page clarifying some questions about SB 973.  Here are five issues California employers

Employers only have to read the following paragraph from JoeBiden.com to get an overall sense of what employment legal changes are likely under a potential Biden administration:

Yet employers steal about $15 billion a year from working people just by paying workers less than the minimum wage. On top of that, workers experience huge losses