California law starts from a presumption that all employees are non-exempt employees, meaning that they are not exempt from the Labor Code requirements, such as overtime pay, meal and rest breaks, and minimum wage. Exempt employees are designated as such because they are “exempt” from certain wage and hour requirements due to their duties and

California’s minimum wage will be increasing on January 1, 2023 to $15.50 per hour. This Friday’s five reviews how the increase impacts California’s employers and addresses considerations for how employers deal with the patchwork of local jurisdictions that have their own minimum wage requirements:

1. White Collar Exemptions – Salary Requirement Tied to State Minimum

By Veenita Raj and Anthony Zaller

It is a common argument by plaintiff’s counsel in wage and hour class actions: The employer’s policy that requires the employee to remain on the company premises during 10-minute rest breaks facially violates California law.  Therefore, because the employer has a facially invalid rest break policy, it is a

I’ve been working with several clients recently in reviewing various timekeeping and payroll systems and am amazed about the limited capability for some of the software being offered to employers.  With employees’ access to computers, point of sale systems, tablets and other technology, timekeeping should be a seamless function within a company in 2021, but

The California supreme court provided further guidance on employer obligations to provide meal breaks as required under the Labor Code and applicable Wage Orders.  In Donohue v. AMN Services LLC, the California supreme court held that employers may not use time rounding policies in context of meal periods, and time records for meal periods

08/13/2020 UPDATE:

On the date of the initial publication of this article, the Labor Commissioner’s lawsuits against ride-sharing behemoths Uber and Lyft, were in the early stages.  But, the Labor Commissioner’s office is not the only entity seeking relief from the court against Uber and Lyft.  Back on May 5, 2020, the California Attorney General

[06/26/20 UPDATE: Not so fast Bay Area!  Given the current conditions due to coronavirus, Hayward’s and San Carlos’ city councils voted to delay the local minimum wage increase, which was previously scheduled for July 1, 2020.  Now, the increase in the cities’ minimum wage will align with that of the state, at least