There are a lot of California employment law developments at the mid-point of 2019.  Below are five recent videos from our YouTube Channel discussing these new developments.  Subscribe to our YouTube Channel to keep current.

Also, if you are not already subscribed to my Firm’s newsletter, click here to subscribe to receive updates and

With June gloom bearing down on us here in Southern California, it may not feel like it outside, but July is right around the corner.  As written about previously here, many local city and county minimum wage requirements will increase on July 1, 2019.  California employers should review a few items to ensure the

Many local counties and cities are increasing the minimum wage that applies to employers within their jurisdiction on July 1, 2019.  Below is a list of some southern California counties and cities minimum wage requirements.  Some local governments require employers to update the required posters given the new increases taking effect on July 1, 2019

There is no silver bullet for California employers to avoid workplace disputes and litigation.  However, by focusing on a few key best practices, employers can reduce the likelihood of litigation, and if sued, the practices will make defending litigation much easier and can result in a better outcome.  Here are my top five employer practices

In Rodriguez v. Taco Bell Corp., 896 F.3d 952 (9th Cir. 2018), an employee brought a putative class action alleging that Taco Bell’s discounted meal policy effectively denied employees the ability to take a duty free meal break.  At issue in this case was Taco Bell’s policy of offering a discounted meal from the

On March 7, 2019, the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a proposed rulemaking to increase the salary level that employees must receive in order to qualify as an exempt employee.  The DOL sets standards under the Federal Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), but California employers are also required to comply with California’s wage

The process of separating an employee from a company must be clearly set out and planned in advance.  I recommend developing a separation checklist so that all of the company’s policies are followed, as well as any applicable laws that pertain to the employer and their industry.  This article is the fourth article in my

On February 4, 2019, a California Court of Appeal ruled that employees calling their employer to determine if they must come into work is considered reporting to work, and reporting time pay is owed to the employee if they are not required to work that day.  The case is Ward v. Tilly’s, Inc. from the