By Rick Reyes

On Wednesday, April 1, 2020, the Department of Labor (DOL) issued a temporary rule addressing and clarifying multiple issues with respect to the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA), including the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act (EPSLA) and the Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act (FMLA Expansion).  The 124-page temporary

The Department of Labor added additional answers on March 28, 2020 to its website containing Frequently Asked Questions pertaining to the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).  The DOL set forth answers regarding who qualifies as a “health care provider” and an “emergency responder” under the FFCRA:

  1. Who is a “health care provider” for

[Update: See our analysis regarding the Department of Labor’s temporary rule issued on April 1, 2020 setting forth regulations regarding employee and employer documentation here.]

By Rick Reyes

It is no easy task for employers to navigate and comply with the new federal requirements set forth in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). 

The Department of Labor published the required posters employers will need to provide to employees under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act:

Posters:

On March 7, 2019, the United States Department of Labor (“DOL”) issued a proposed rulemaking to increase the salary level that employees must receive in order to qualify as an exempt employee.  The DOL sets standards under the Federal Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), but California employers are also required to comply with California’s wage

Welcome to Friday’s Five!  Here are five video excepts from a presentation I conducted in September 2016 to a group of restaurateurs:

  • exempt employee overview
  • the DOL’s increase in the salary basis test and what it means for employers
  • California’s minimum wage – state and local considerations

Please let

On May 18, 2016 the Department of Labor issued long awaited changes to the Federal rules setting forth the requirements for employees to qualify as exempt under the white collar exemptions.  Exempt employees are “exempt” from some labor laws governing employees, such as overtime pay.  Exempt employees are designated as such because they are

In July 2015, the Department of Labor proposed regulations that would increase the salary amount employers would need to pay for employees to qualify as exempt.  If adopted, the proposal would require that employees would have to earn at least $50,440 per year in order to qualify for most exemptions in 2016.  This episode