A lot was happening this week in California’s employment law.  This week’s Friday’s Five is a round-up on the highlights:

1.       Los Angeles City Council votes to require employers to provide 6 days of paid sick leave.

The LA City Council approved a measure to require employers to provide employees up to six paid sick

2016 will be a year in which joint employer liability will be a major issue for employers.  Why am I making this prediction?  First, the NLRB has refocused attention to this issue in hopes of expanding the number of employers that can be found jointly liable.  Second, the Department of Labor issued an Administrative Interpretation

Happy New Year!  This Friday’s Five consists of five new video’s taken from a recent presentation I conducted on new employment laws facing California employers in 2016.  Wishing everyone the best in 2016.

2016 Update: California’s new equal pay protections:

2016 Update: Meal and rest break considerations:

2016 Update: Minimum wage increases state

As we approach the close of 2015, employers should take the time to review their employment law policies and practices.  I’m often asked where should the process start?  Here are five areas employers can focus on to start the audit process:

1.      Employee handbooks

Employers need to ensure their policies are up to date, and

Today’s Friday’s Five is a short video about five employment law considerations employers should review at the end of 2015.  As mentioned in the video, I will be conducting a webinar on December 2, 2015 for employers to understand and comply with new employment laws taking effect in 2016.  I will also discuss new

Jillian Sanzone worked for Three D, LLD, d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille, as a waitress and bartender and Vincent Spinella worked as a cook.  The employees realized that they owed more money in State income taxes than expected and complained to the employer.  Sanzone, Spinella, and another former employee, Jamie LaFrance, began posting

In July 2015, Governor Brown signed legislation designed to overturn the decision in Rope v. Auto-Chlor System of Washington Inc.  The case involved an employee who was asking his employer for an accommodation to take a future leave of absence in order to donate a kidney to his sister.  As discussed below, the case raises

This week, a federal court in northern California certified portions of a class action Picture - driverbrought by Uber drivers who worked in California since 2009 (click here for the decision [PDF]).  Over 160,000 drivers have worked for Uber in California during this time period, and while the case is making a lot of news,

I was able to catch up with California Restaurant Association’s CEO, Jot Condie at the 2015 Western Foodservice & Hospitality Expo.  We discuss the threats facing restaurateurs and the steps the CRA is taking to represent its members.

 

This Friday’s Five covers five employment law developments that occurred in August 2015 that will have an impact for employers in California.

1)     NLRB ruling widens which companies may be considered “joint employers”

In a 3-2 decision, the NLRB ruled that Browning-Ferris Industries of California, Inc. was a joint employer with a staffing agency, Leadpoint