This Friday’s Five lists five action items employers should utilize when conducting harassment investigations:

1. Selecting the investigator

Employers should take time to train an in-house person who can conduct harassment investigations.  This person, usually someone from Human Resources (but it does not need to be) should have additional experience and training about how to

[Update: AB 3080 was vetoed by the Governor on September 30, 2018, and will not become law.  Click here to see other bills that were approved by the Governor and will become law for California employers in 2019.]

California legislature passed AB 3080 which prohibits employers from entering into arbitration agreements with employees and

Matt Lauer’s abrupt departure from NBC illustrate important lessons employers should take away from this week’s events in how to investigate and respond to harassment claims.  It is important it note that NBC is not like most employers in that this one of the most newsworthy and public harassment allegation cases in the nation and

This Friday’s Five sets out five resources that are free for California employers that are published by the state of California.  Employers need to understand that while these publications are made available by the state of California, the agencies publishing the resources are only expressing their opinion about the current status of the law, but

A former employee at Uber has made news this week in claiming that she was subjected to sexual question markharassment while working at Uber, and her complaints were not satisfactorily resolved.  I don’t want to get into the judgment of who was possibly right or wrong in this case, but use it as a good

Yes, it is only April, but even if employers updated their handbooks at the beginning of 2016, they should take another look at the handbooks to ensure they comply with new regulations issued by California’s Fair Employment and Housing Council.  The new regulations under the Fair Employment and Housing Act are effective April 1,

Employers need to review their compliance with California’s sexual harassment training requirements on a periodic basis.  When doing so, it is a good time to update policies and remind employees about the company’s policies on a routine basis – not just when a complaint is made.  This Friday’s Five provides reminders about sexual harassment training

The laws passed in 2014 added some new posting requirements and resulted in the need to
revise some of the notices California employers are required to provide to employees. This Friday’s Five Best Practices article sets out five items California employers should review before the start of 2015:

1. Review newly published frequently asked questions

1. Have a good anti-harassment policy and conduct required training for supervisors.

It is legally required that all California employers provide information to employees regarding harassment. The Department of Fair Employment and Housing provides the following guidelines for employers:

Employers must help ensure a workplace free from sexual harassment by distributing to employees information on