Do employers need to have a computerized timekeeping system to comply with their requirements under California law?  With technological advances, it is hard to remember that just 10 years ago these questions were on top of everyone’s mind, but today it is sometimes assumed that it must be legal to keep these records electronically.  However,

Employers should remember to take time to review their employee documentation, retention policies, and how this information is being saved on a periodic basis.  Here are five record retention issues employers should audit as of April 2022:

1. Are employee time records maintained for at least four years?

The statute of limitations can reach back

I’ve been working with several clients recently in reviewing various timekeeping and payroll systems and am amazed about the limited capability for some of the software being offered to employers.  With employees’ access to computers, point of sale systems, tablets and other technology, timekeeping should be a seamless function within a company in 2021, but

California employers have many obligations under the Labor Code to create and maintain time records.  However, the Labor Code does not address many specific issues about time keeping systems and employers moving to electronic records.  While employers have not yet started to use the blockchain to record employee’s time and report pay information to employees

There is no silver bullet for California employers to avoid workplace disputes and litigation.  However, by focusing on a few key best practices, employers can reduce the likelihood of litigation, and if sued, the practices will make defending litigation much easier and can result in a better outcome.  Here are my top five employer practices