I’ve been working with several clients recently in reviewing various timekeeping and payroll systems and am amazed about the limited capability for some of the software being offered to employers.  With employees’ access to computers, point of sale systems, tablets and other technology, timekeeping should be a seamless function within a company in 2021, but

California employers have many obligations under the Labor Code to create and maintain time records.  However, the Labor Code does not address many specific issues about time keeping systems and employers moving to electronic records.  While employers have not yet started to use the blockchain to record employee’s time and report pay information to employees

There is no silver bullet for California employers to avoid workplace disputes and litigation.  However, by focusing on a few key best practices, employers can reduce the likelihood of litigation, and if sued, the practices will make defending litigation much easier and can result in a better outcome.  Here are my top five employer practices

Employee document storage and retention policies: it is not cutting edge legal theory or management philosophy, but companies that think about and actively develop a plan will save large amounts of money.  The costs savings will come from being able to better defend litigation because the key documents were maintained, and it will come in

In See’s Candy Shops, Inc. v. Superior Court the court addressed whether an employer’s policy of rounding  employee’s time clock entries to the nearest tenth of an hour.  See’s Candy’s policy rounded employees’ time entries either up or down to the nearest tenth of an hour in its Kronos time keeping system. For example, if