As reported previously on this blog, the minimum wage for California’s fast-food operators will increase to $20 per hour on April 1, 2024 under AB 1228.  The new law applies to national fast food chains, which are defined as “limited-service restaurants consisting of more than 60 establishments nationally that share a common brand, or that

Do employers need to have a computerized timekeeping system to comply with their requirements under California law?  With technological advances, it is hard to remember that just 10 years ago these questions were on top of everyone’s mind, but today it is sometimes assumed that it must be legal to keep these records electronically.  However,

Employers should remember to take time to review their employee documentation, retention policies, and how this information is being saved on a periodic basis.  Here are five record retention issues employers should audit as of April 2022:

1. Are employee time records maintained for at least four years?

The statute of limitations can reach back

Labor Code section 226 requires that employers provide to employees semimonthly or at the time of each payment of wages, either as a detachable part of the check, or separately if wages are paid by personal check or cash, accurate itemized statements in writing.  The Labor Code refers to these documents as “itemized statements”, but

California employers have many obligations under the Labor Code to create and maintain time records.  However, the Labor Code does not address many specific issues about time keeping systems and employers moving to electronic records.  While employers have not yet started to use the blockchain to record employee’s time and report pay information to employees

California employment law is a mind field that carries huge exposure for employers not proactively monitoring legal developments and potential legal issues.  There are some statements employers in California should never make, and this Friday’s Five reviews misaligned statements that can create significant liability for an employer.

1. My company has employment practices liability insurance

Many cities and counties across California are set to increase their minimum wages in July 2017, and employers need to start preparing now.  For example, Los Angeles City and County are increasing the minimum wage for employers with 26 or more employees to $12 per hour on July 1, 2017 (currently at $10.50 per

As we approach the close of 2015, employers should take the time to review their employment law policies and practices.  I’m often asked where should the process start?  Here are five areas employers can focus on to start the audit process:

1.      Employee handbooks

Employers need to ensure their policies are up to date, and

Today’s Friday’s Five is a short video about five employment law considerations employers should review at the end of 2015.  As mentioned in the video, I will be conducting a webinar on December 2, 2015 for employers to understand and comply with new employment laws taking effect in 2016.  I will also discuss new