As written about previously, Governor Newsom signed new legislation on March 19, 2021 requiring California employers to provide COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave.  California employers were required to provide California COVID-19 supplemental paid sick leave under an old law passed in 2020 that expired on December 31, 2020.  There are a few key differences

Update: Governor Newsom signed SB-95 on March 19, 2021.  Therefore, employers have until March 29, 2021 to ensure compliance with the new requirements. 

California’s supplemental paid sick leave for employees and food sector employees expired on December 31, 2020.  Just as California businesses are starting to reopen, California’s legislature passed and presented to Governor

[Update: This article has been updated to reflect the new guidance from California’s Department of Fair Employment and Housing (“DFEH”) issued in March]

Many questions exist about the COVID-19 vaccine in terms of the workplace and employees.  Here are five common questions employers face in terms of mandating the vaccine and requirements that apply to

Late last year, Cal/OSHA implemented Emergency Temporary Standards that imposed dramatic new testing, training, and recordkeeping requirements related to COVID-19 exposure in the workplace. Most controversial of these new requirements was a mandate that employers “continue and maintain an employee’s earnings, seniority, and all other employee rights and benefits” for employees excluded from the workplace

On January 26, 2021, Los Angeles County extended the Los Angeles County COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Ordinance to continue “until two weeks after the expiration of the COVID-19 local emergency as ratified and declared by the Board.”  The new ordinance also retroactively applies to businesses starting on January 1, 2021.  The new ordinance differs

On December 1, new Cal/OSHA Emergency Temporary Standards (ETS) went into effect, creating a host of new COVID-19 obligations for employers. Included in the ETS regulations are specific testing procedures, training and prevention protocols, and recordkeeping and reporting requirements. The ETS regulations include several controversial provisions, including stringent 14-day exclusion requirements for asymptomatic close

Governor Newsom announced today that all dine-in at California restaurants must stop immediately for certain counties for the next 3 weeks, due to a recent spike in COVID-19 cases. Restaurants can continue outdoor dining and pick-up and delivery services.  Bars must close all operations even if they are operating outdoors.

As of July 1, 2020,