California employers need to review their hiring processes, interview questions, and on boarding practices to comply with California’s new laws regarding what types of questions can be asked and background checks. This video contains few portions of a presentation I conducted for a group of California employers covering new hiring laws facing California employers in 2018, including:

  • AB 168 (Labor Code section 432.3) effective January 1, 2018 bans employers from asking about prior salary history.
  • Criminal history prohibitions, and
  • the need to update applications and hiring forms to remove questions seeking this type of information

AB 168 was approved by Governor Brown on October 12, 2017 which prohibits employers from seeking or taking into consideration an applicant’s prior compensation and benefits when determining whether to hire the applicant, and in setting the applicant’s compensation and benefits.  The new law creates Labor Code section 432.3.  This Friday’s Five covers five issues of the new law that employers must understand:

1. The law applies to all employers, regardless of size, effective January 1, 2018.

2. Employers may not rely on salary history information of an applicant in determining whether to offer employment and in determining the about of compensation to offer.

3. Employers may not seek salary history information, which includes compensation and benefits, about the applicant.

4. Upon a reasonable request, an employer must provide the “pay scale” for the position to an applicant.

5. Nothing in the law prohibits employees from voluntarily disclosing salary history to a prospective employer.

AB 168 was approved by Governor Brown on October 12, 2017 which prohibits employers from seeking or taking into consideration an applicant’s prior compensation and benefits when determining whether to hire the applicant, and in setting the applicant’s compensation and benefits.  The new law creates Labor Code section 432.3.  This Friday’s Five covers five issues of the new law that employers must understand:

  1. The law applies to all employers, regardless of size, effective January 1, 2018.
  2. Employers may not rely on salary history information of an applicant in determining whether to offer employment and in determining the about of compensation to offer.
  3. Employers may not seek salary history information, which includes compensation and benefits, about the applicant.
  4. Upon a reasonable request, an employer must provide the “pay scale” for the position to an applicant.
  5. Nothing in the law prohibits employees from voluntarily disclosing salary history to a prospective employer.

Employers should start taking steps to comply with the new law by the beginning of the new year to ensure compliance.  Some steps to consider include:

  • Train hiring managers about new law and that they are not to seek information from applicants regarding prior salary and benefits history.
  • Remove any requests or questions about salaries at prior employment on applications or other documents provided to candidates.
  • Prepare a set “pay scale” for the positions the employer is hiring for. The law does not set forth what information must be included on the pay scale.  In addition, the law does not explicitly require that this information must be provided in writing to the applicant.  However, employers should consider whether the pay scale should be done in writing in case there is a dispute about whether the pay scale was provided to the applicant and what information was conveyed to the applicant.

California’s state legislature is nearing the end of its term, and employers are beginning to glimpse some of the laws that could apply in 2018.  There are multiple proposed bills that prohibits employers’ ability to rely upon or seek information about applicant’s previous wages to set the employee’s pay.  This Friday’s Five reviews the current law – California’s Fair Pay Act, the proposed bills on disclosure of wages, and San Francisco’s local ordinance that recently passed.

1. Current law – California’s Fair Pay Act (Labor Code section 1197.5)

Existing law generally prohibits an employer from paying an employee at wage rates less than the rates paid to employees of the opposite sex in the same establishment for equal work for work performance that requires equal skill, effort, and responsibility that are performed under similar working conditions.  Effective as of January 1, 2017, AB 1676 amended California’s Fair Pay Act, found in Labor Code section 1197.5, prohibiting employers from relying on an employee’s prior salary, by itself, to justify any disparity in compensation.  It is important to note the bill was modified to take out language that would have prohibited employers from obtaining an applicant’s prior salary.

2. Proposed State Bill – AB 1209 – Gender Pay Gap Transparency Act

This bill has been sent to the Governor’s desk during the week of September 11, 2017 to be signed into law or vetoed.  The bill, if signed by the Governor, would require employers with at least 500 employees to calculate the difference between the wages of male and female exempt employees in California by each job classification or title.  The employer would also have to do the same for all board members who are located in California.  The employer would need to report the difference in pay, which would be published on the Internet by the Secretary of State.  Governor Brown has until October 15, 2017 to sign or veto the bill.

3. Proposed State Bill – AB 168 – Salary Information

This bill prohibits employers from replying upon or seeking salary history from applicants.  In addition, employers would be required to provide the pay scale for a position to an applicant.

4. San Francisco local ordinance: Parity in Pay Ordinance

San Francisco passed a local law that prohibits employers from asking job applicants to disclose their salary history.  It also prohibits employers from considering an applicant’s pay history as a factor in determining the level of pay to offer.  The law is effective July 1, 2018, so San Francisco employers have some time to review hiring practices to comply.

5. Proposed State Bill – AB 46 – Wage Discrimination

This bill amends the California Fair Pay Act to make clear that the law applies to both public and private employers.

IMG_4751 (1)Mid-way through 2017 and the California legislature is busy and, as expected, there are a number of employment law bills making their way through the legislature.  This Friday’s Five reviews five bills that could have a major impact upon California employers if passed:

1. AB 168 – Prohibition of asking salary history when hiring employees.

This bill prohibits employers from seeking salary history information from applicants and requires employers to set pay scale for positions and to provide this information to applicants.

2. AB 1008 – Statewide “Ban the Box” (limiting any questions by employers about criminal histories on applications).

Los Angeles and San Francisco have already passed regulations prohibiting employers for asking about criminal histories before a job is offered to employee.  This bill would apply similar requirements on employers state-wide.

3. AB 1565 – Increasing the required salary threshold to $47,472 annually ($3,965/month) for white collar exempt employees.

To qualify as an executive, administrative, or professional employee exemption, employers bear the burden of establishing that the employee is paid a salary the equivalent of two times the state minimum wage and that the employee spends more than 50% of their time on exempt duties.  With the state minimum wage at $10.50 per hour for large employers as of January 1, 2017 the currant salary level that must be paid in order to qualify for the white collar exemptions is $43,680/year.  On January 1, 2018, the state minimum wage increases to $11 per hour for large employers, raising the salary required for exempt employees to $45,760/year.  This bill proposes to increase the salary required to be paid to employees to meet the white collar exemptions since the Department of Labor’s attempt to do this on a federal level stalled at the end of last year.

4. AB 1209 – Internet publication of wages based on gender. This bill would require employers to publish information about “pay gender differentials” on a website open to the public. 

The bill would apply to employers who are required to file a statement of information with the Secretary of State and who have 250 or more employees to collect specified information on gender pay differentials. The bill would require an employer to annually update, publish, and submit the information.

5. SB 63 – Require small businesses to provide parental leave.

Currently, employers with 50 or more employees are required to comply with the California Family Rights Act and provide parental leave of up to 12 weeks to bond with a new child within one year of the birth.  This bill would lower the number of employees for covered businesses to 20 employees in a 75-mile radius.  The bill would also prohibit an employer from refusing to maintain and pay for coverage under a group health plan for an employee who takes this leave.