This week’s Friday Five is a discussion focused on a discussion of considerations employers should make during the termination process, such as:

  • how to document reasons for terminations (and why it is important to be accurate and honest)
  • when final wages are due
  • where to provide final wages
  • payment of expense reimbursements, and
  • direct deposit

Friday’s 5 is here.  This post covers five issues that commonly arise when dealing with employment Shaking handscontracts and non-competition/non-solicitation agreements.  It is a very broad area to discuss, so, as always, this is a very general overview.  However, employers and executives alike should have a basic understanding about the legalities and enforceability of such clauses

Today’s Friday’s Five focuses on five aspects of responding to employee’s complaints made on social media.  Yelp has been in the news recently (Another ex-Yelp worker is calling the company out after being fired, CNNMoney; Yelp’s Tweet About Fired Employee Could Spell Legal Trouble, Inc.com [I was quoted in this article]), for

Happy Friday!  This Friday’s Five focuses on the termination process.  Employers should develop a termination checklist to ensure all documents and contingencies are consistently covered during the process.  Here are five pointers employers can use to start in developing their own checklist:

1.      Final wages must be timely paid.

The employee’s wages must be paid

Gary Vaynerchuk discusses how he uses social media to engage with his 500 or so employees and addresses the risks on The Ask Gary Vee Show, episode 176 (video below).   Gary made his career using social media, and continues to do so in running his digital media company, Vayner Media.  So it does not

Jillian Sanzone worked for Three D, LLD, d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille, as a waitress and bartender and Vincent Spinella worked as a cook.  The employees realized that they owed more money in State income taxes than expected and complained to the employer.  Sanzone, Spinella, and another former employee, Jamie LaFrance, began posting

Employers usually face defamation claims in connection with wrongful termination allegations.  Defamation claims can arise in twoNestor Galina forms: libel (written) and slander (spoken).  Defamation can result from a variety of different scenarios, such as: statements made to others during a workplace investigation, explaining to colleagues the reasons why an employee was terminated, the employee’s claim

Many employers have new hire packets and hiring procedures, but just as important, and often overlooked by employers, is to have a process for departing employees. It is important to ensure an employee departing the company provides all items back to the company and is provided any legally required documentation, and is a good opportunity