Today, May 12, 2020, Governor Newsom announced guidelines for businesses, including restaurants, to continue to open under the “expanded” Phase 2 in California.

Early Stage 2 business that were permitted to reopen on May 8 included:

  • Curb-side Retail
  • Manufacturers
  • Logistics
  • Childcare for those outside of the essential workforce

Expanded Stage 2 businesses

Businesses getting ready to re-open need to consider yet another item on the re-opening checklist: an Injury, Illness and Prevention Plan (IIPP) to address COVID-19. Title 8 of the California Code of Regulations section 3203 requires every employer to develop a written IIPP that protects employees from workplace hazards. Most California workplaces now must consider

In an interesting and surprising turn of events, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the agency responsible for enforcing federal anti-discrimination laws in the workplace, removed the Frequently Asked Questions section from its website. The FAQ provided guidance on accommodating workers with medical conditions, issues of harassment and retaliation, and a “Return to Work” due

A frequent question asked at our webinars is what liability employers might face from claims that employees contracted COVID-19 at work. Governor Newsom provided clarity on that question today.

Newsom issued Executive Order N-62-20, creating a rebuttable presumption that an employee’s COVID-19-related illness arose out of the course of employment for workers’ compensation purposes

Essential businesses operating throughout California must pay careful attention to local Orders requiring social distancing protocols (SDPs).  With many of the original Orders set to expire at the beginning of May, many counties are extending their original SDPs with additional requirements.  Below is a list of five counties we have been receiving routine questions about

Due to the effect COVID-19 has had on the economy and across all industries, Los Angeles City has been in the forefront of protecting the workforce by providing further benefits and protections to workers.  Simultaneously, however, new worker protections effectively translate into new burdens on employers.

Last week, the City Council addressed and amended two

Governor Newsom

On April 16, 2020, Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N-51-20, which provides new paid sick leave to certain food service workers. Citing a need to fill a “gap” left by the federal Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which applies solely to employers with fewer than 500 employees, this new Executive Order provides up to 80 hours of “COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave” to defined food sector workers.

(Zaller Law Group is hosting a free webinar on Friday, April 24, 2020, to discuss this new Executive Order and answer your questions. Join us for Understanding California’s New Paid Sick Leave Requirements For Food Sector Employees.)

Here is what you need to know.

What employers are covered?

Executive Order N-51-20 applies to employers with 500 or more employees in the United States, including full-time and part-time workers but not including independent contractors. Employees on leave of any kind are counted, but employees furloughed or laid off are not counted unless and until they are reemployed.

The Executive Order expressly applies to any “Delivery Network Company” (companies that use a website or mobile app to enable local delivery of products/food from third-party merchants; think Postmates or GrubHub) and any “Transportation Network Company” (companies that provide transportation services using online apps/platforms that connect passengers with drivers using a personal vehicle; think Uber or Lyft) that employs 500 or more employees.

As with the FFCRA and FMLA, common employees of joint or integrated employers must be counted together.

There is one exception: if, as of April 16, 2020, the employer already provides a “supplemental benefit” such as paid leave that provides the same or greater benefit provided by this Executive Order, then the employer does not have to provide the COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave.

What employees are entitled to Supplemental Paid Sick Leave?

The Executive Order applies to “Food Sector Workers,” which it defines as any person who satisfies one of the following criteria:


Continue Reading California’s COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave Order: What Employers Need to Know