Employees Need To Take Control Of Their Online Identities

The recent (and not too recent) flurry of attention that has been given to the issue regarding whether employers can ask applicants and employees for their Facebook passwords is a good review of what is appropriate conduct for employers, but it is also a good reminder to employees that what they do online is of critical importance to their employment. Asking employees for passwords to social media account may cross the line. But how about Googling an applicant’s or employee’s name to find out more about them? This is not even an issue – or should not be one – given that this information is open to the public. I’ve even argued in the past that it could be negligent for an employer not to do this basic background internet check.

The Internet affords employers the ability to see beyond a resume to make better informed hiring decisions. If fact, Dorie Clark of the HBR Blog Network makes the point that everyone’s online presence is critically important to their professional careers. Dorie notes:

Sure, they probably have a Facebook account, and they may even be on Twitter. But they don't recognize that these are no longer personal communication tools, or a means of strengthening weak ties across their networks. Instead, they are the criteria by which you will be evaluated in the future. Just as Michael Deaver ensured that Ronald Reagan always stood in front of a perfect, picturesque backdrop — and set the standard for all subsequent leaders — you're now responsible for curating your image.

Dorie makes the observations that with the Internet: (1) your reputation always precedes you, (2) if you’re invisible online, you’re probably a fraud, (3) you progress or you stagnate (i.e., you create a valuable source of content through your twitter feed, blogging, etc…).

My interview with Guy Kawasaki last year discussed many of the same points. Guy noted that if you don’t have a Facebook page, or any other online presence, it will raise some questions about you. Are you not technical enough to get onto social media platforms? Are you hiding something?

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